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Physiology is the study of how the body works under normal conditions. You use physiology when you exercise, read, breathe, sleep, or do just about anything. Physiology is generally divided into ten major organ systems. This website looks at each one in a bit more detail.
From 1990-2000
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Alfred Gilman and Martin Rodbell perform seminal studies elucidating the general mechanism of message transduction from the exterior of the cell to its interior. They discover that G-proteins play a crucial role in relaying sensory and hormonal messages to the cells. This finding leads researchers toward an improved understanding of widespread diseases like cholera and diabetes, and wins them the Nobel Prize in 1994.
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    New species of “glass frogs” discovered in Peru

    Researchers in Peru have discovered four new species of tiny so-called “glass frogs” (family: Centrolenidae). Centrolene charapita: with the yellow splotches on its back, this species was aptly named after little yellow chili peppers. Their hindlegs also had fleshy little zigzag-like protuberances whose purpose is unknown. Cochranella guayasamini: This species is mostly green with yellow encircling its…

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    History of the American Physiological Society

    The American Physiological Society was founded in 1887 with 28 members. Today, the Society counts some 11,000 members, most of whom hold doctoral degrees in medicine, physiology or other health professions. Our work, then, as now, was to support research, education, and circulation of information in the physiological sciences.

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