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TODAY'S DATE: Wednesday, June 28, 2017
Physiological System of the Month: The Respiratory SystemOn the Edge of Extinction: Tiny Pupfish Go without Breathing to Survive their Harsh Environment
  • I SPY PHYSIOLOGY
    I SPY PHYSIOLOGY

    The Brain in Your Gut

    Did you know your gut has a brain of its own? It’s called the enteric nervous system. The brain in your gut is embedded in the wall of the digestive tract. Together with your “big brain,” the enteric nervous system helps control gastrointestinal function, including the mixing and grinding of food in the stomach and … Continue reading The Brain in Your Gut

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    Read Our Latest Blog

    Snakes to the rescue! Novel antiplatelet found in venom

    Platelets are important in the formation of blood clots. For this reason, antiplatelet medications are commonly prescribed for people at risk of developing blood clots, or who have already developed one. Many of the medications that are currently on the market to treat blood clots come with a risk for excessive bleeding and reduced platelet numbers.…

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    Walking Benefits the Brain

    Released April 24, 2017 - Researchers at New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU) found that the foot’s impact during walking sends pressure waves through the arteries that significantly modify and can increase the supply of blood to the brain. The research is presented at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago.

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    Overview

    History of the American Physiological Society

    The American Physiological Society was founded in 1887 with 28 members. Today, the Society counts some 11,000 members, most of whom hold doctoral degrees in medicine, physiology or other health professions. Our work, then, as now, was to support research, education, and circulation of information in the physiological sciences.

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Ivan Pavlov begins extensive research on "conditional reflexes" involving dogs' saliva production in relation to various sounds and other visual stimuli. He is awarded the 1904 Nobel Prize for his discoveries on the neural regulation of salivary, gastric and pancreatic secretion.

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