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TODAY'S DATE: Saturday, December 03, 2016
Physiological System of the Month: The Respiratory SystemOn the Edge of Extinction: Tiny Pupfish Go without Breathing to Survive their Harsh Environment
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    Eating saturated fat is bad for the brain

    I know this is not a comparative physiology topic, but this article caught my attention as I know I just ate a rather high fat meal last week for Thanksgiving and I plan to do the same throughout the holiday season. Insulin does more than just lowering blood sugar by increasing its uptake into tissues.…

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    Increased SIDS Risk

    Released November 15,2016 - Researchers are a step closer to understanding why cigarette smoke exposure during pregnancy may increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). SIDS is the unexplained, sudden death of a child younger than one year of age. A new study published in the American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology finds that prenatal cigarette smoke exposure in rats affected breathing responses and immune function of their offspring. Breathing and immune function are further negatively affected by high room temperatures.

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    Overview

    History of the American Physiological Society

    The American Physiological Society was founded in 1887 with 28 members. Today, the Society counts some 11,000 members, most of whom hold doctoral degrees in medicine, physiology or other health professions. Our work, then, as now, was to support research, education, and circulation of information in the physiological sciences.

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From 1990-2000
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Alfred Gilman and Martin Rodbell perform seminal studies elucidating the general mechanism of message transduction from the exterior of the cell to its interior. They discover that G-proteins play a crucial role in relaying sensory and hormonal messages to the cells. This finding leads researchers toward an improved understanding of widespread diseases like cholera and diabetes, and wins them the Nobel Prize in 1994.

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