2018 Press Releases


  • Exercise Following Weight Loss May Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

    Released December 12, 2018 - New research suggests that exercise is a key factor in reducing colorectal cancer risk after weight loss. According to the study, physical activity causes beneficial changes in the bone marrow. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Exercise May Improve Kidney Function in Obesity, Reduce Risk of Renal Disease

    Released December 4, 2018 - Aerobic exercise may reduce the risk of diabetes-related kidney disease in some people, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for December.
  • Curry Spice Boosts Exercise Performance in Mice with Heart Failure

    Released November 29, 2018 - New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Can’t Exercise? A Hot Bath May Help Improve Inflammation, Metabolism, Study Suggests

    Released November 14, 2018 Hot water treatment may help improve inflammation and blood sugar (glucose) levels in people who are unable to exercise, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Exercise Helps Bones, but Not Metabolism, in Ovarian Function Loss

    Released October 1, 2018 - Exercise may reduce the risk of osteoporosis associated with the loss of ovarian function, but fitness may not protect against related metabolic changes and weight gain, a new study reports. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Crunched for Time? High-intensity Exercise = Same Cell Benefits in Fewer Minutes

    Released September 20, 2018 - A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Heat Therapy Boosts Mitochondrial Function in Muscles

    Released July 31, 2018 - A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease. The study—the first of its kind in humans—is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Mental, Not Physical, Fatigue Affects Seniors’ Walking Ability

    Released April 24, 2018 - Low “mental energy” may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research about the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Drinking Water May Help Exercising Seniors Stay Mentally Sharp

    Released April 22, 2018 - Older people should drink more water to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, new research suggests. The study, to be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego, explores the association between hydration status before exercising and exercise-enhanced cognition in older adults.
  • Resistance Exercise Improves Insulin Resistance, Glucose Levels

    Released April 3, 2018 - A new study suggests that resistance exercise may improve indicators of type 2 diabetes by increasing expression of a protein that regulates blood sugar (glucose) absorption in the body. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism, was chosen as an APSselect article for April.