2018 Press Releases


  • Exercise May Improve Kidney Function in Obesity, Reduce Risk of Renal Disease

    Released December 4, 2018 - Aerobic exercise may reduce the risk of diabetes-related kidney disease in some people, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for December.
  • Curry Spice Boosts Exercise Performance in Mice with Heart Failure

    Released November 29, 2018 - New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Can’t Exercise? A Hot Bath May Help Improve Inflammation, Metabolism, Study Suggests

    Released November 14, 2018 Hot water treatment may help improve inflammation and blood sugar (glucose) levels in people who are unable to exercise, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Eat Your Vegetables (and Fish): Another Reason Why They May Promote Heart Health

    Released November 6, 2018 - Elevated levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)—a compound linked with the consumption of seafood and a primarily vegetarian diet—may reduce hypertension-related heart disease symptoms. New research in rats finds that low-dose treatment with TMAO reduced heart thickening (cardiac fibrosis) and markers of heart failure in an animal model of hypertension. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for November.
  • Motion Sickness vs. Cybersickness: Two Different Problems or the Same Condition?

    Released October 23, 2018 - Contrary to previous research, severe motion sickness and cybersickness—a type of motion sickness that stems from exposure to virtual reality—may be considered the same clinical condition, according to researchers. The findings, the first to study both conditions in the same group of people, are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • E-Cigarette Flavorings, Additives Increase Inflammation and Impair Lung Function

    Released October 11, 2018 - Flavoring and additive ingredients in e-cigarettes may increase inflammation and impair lung function, according to new research. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, also found that short-term exposure to e-cigarettes was enough to cause lung inflammation similar or worse than that seen in traditional cigarette use. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for October.
  • Chemotherapy May Lead to Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle

    Released October 4, 2018 - Chemotherapy drugs to treat breast cancer may promote muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, according to new research. Dysfunctional mitochondria, the energy centers of the cells, may contribute to fatigue and weakness that people with breast cancer may experience through the course of disease treatment. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Hormone Therapy for ‘Low T’ May Not Be Safe for All Men

    Released October 3, 2018 - Boosting testosterone levels with hormone supplements may not be safe or appropriate for all men with low testosterone (low T), according to new research. Recent findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Study Finds More Belly Fat, Less Muscle After Crash Dieting

    Released October 2, 2018 - Extreme dieting causes short-term body changes that may have long-term health consequences, according to a new study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • High-fat, High-sugar Diet May Impair Future Fertility in Females

    Released October 2, 2018 - The differences in the way males and females respond to a high-fat, high-sugar diet may include impairment of female fertility, new research suggests. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Delayed Pregnancy = Heart Health Risks for Moms and Sons, Study Shows

    Released October 1, 2018 - Delaying pregnancy may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in both women and their children, with boys at higher risk of disease, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Alberta in Canada will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Exercise Helps Bones, but Not Metabolism, in Ovarian Function Loss

    Released October 1, 2018 - Exercise may reduce the risk of osteoporosis associated with the loss of ovarian function, but fitness may not protect against related metabolic changes and weight gain, a new study reports. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Drug Cocktail May Treat Postmenopausal PCOS Complications

    Released October 1, 2018 - A combination of a diabetes drug and a high blood pressure medication may effectively treat all symptoms of postmenopausal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Anxious and Forgetful after Menopause? Low Estrogen May Be to Blame

    Released October 1, 2018 - Lack of estrogen may play a role in the development of anxiety and memory problems, according to a new rodent study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Crunched for Time? High-intensity Exercise = Same Cell Benefits in Fewer Minutes

    Released September 20, 2018 - A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Obesity Alters Airway Muscle Function, Increases Asthma Risk

    Released September 13, 2018 - New research suggests that obesity changes how airway muscles function, increasing the risk of developing asthma. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.
  • Losing Just Six Hours of Sleep Could Increase Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

    Released September 5, 2018 - Losing a single night’s sleep may affect the liver’s ability to produce glucose and process insulin, increasing the risk of metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis (fatty liver) and type 2 diabetes. The findings of the mouse study are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for September.
  • Gum Disease Treatment May Improve Symptoms in Cirrhosis Patients

    Released August 29, 2018 - Routine oral care to treat gum disease (periodontitis) may play a role in reducing inflammation and toxins in the blood (endotoxemia) and improving cognitive function in people with liver cirrhosis. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Caution Needed When Prescribing Antibiotics to Hypertension Patients, Study Finds

    Released August 23, 2018 - Individual variations in genetic makeup and gut bacteria may explain the different effects of antibiotics on blood pressure, a new rat study suggests. The findings are published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • More Protein after Weight Loss May Reduce Fatty Liver Disease

    Released August 16, 2018 - Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver’s fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Estrogen May Protect Against Depression after Heart Attack

    Released August 9, 2018 - Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Blocking Digestive Hormone May Prevent Diet-Induced Pancreatic Cancer

    Released August 2, 2018 - A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking CCK may help prevent the spread of pancreatic tumors to other areas of the body (metastases). The new findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for August.
  • Heat Therapy Boosts Mitochondrial Function in Muscles

    Released July 31, 2018 - A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease. The study—the first of its kind in humans—is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Diabetes during Pregnancy May Increase Baby’s Heart Disease Risk

    Released July 19, 2018 - Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein’s function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Smell Receptors in the Body Could Help Sniff Out Disease

    Released July 12, 2018 - A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors—proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell—perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer. The article is published in the July issue of Physiological Reviews.
  • Stem Cell Transplant Drug May Protect against Smoke-related COPD Symptoms

    Released July 3, 2018 - New research suggests that a drug shown to mobilize stem cells in patients with certain cancers that need stem cell transplantation may also protect against cigarette smoke-induced lung injury. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for July.
  • Obesity + Aging Linked to Alzheimer’s Markers in the Brain

    Released June 28, 2018 - A new study suggests that when a high-fat, high-sugar diet that leads to obesity is paired with normal aging, it may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, researchers discovered that certain areas of the brain respond differently to risk factors associated with Alzheimer’s. The study is published in Physiological Reports.
  • Increased Electrical Activity in Eye May Relieve Short-term Dry Eye Pain

    Released June 6, 2018 - A boost of electrical activity in the eye’s mucous membranes may lead to new treatments for the painful condition known as dry eye. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for June.
  • Heavier Astronauts Have Higher Risk of Post-flight Eye Changes

    Released May 31, 2018 - New research suggests that changes in the eye that occur during spaceflight may be related to how much an astronaut weighs. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Omega-3, Omega-6 in Diet Alters Gene Expression in Obesity

    Released May 15, 2018 - A new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • Increased Nerve Activity May Raise Blood Pressure in Anxiety

    Released May 3, 2018 - Sympathetic nerve activity to skeletal muscle blood vessels—a function of the nervous system that helps regulate blood pressure—increases during physiological and mental stress in people with chronic anxiety, a new study finds. Over time, this response may increase the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, although the study did not test this specifically. The study, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for May.
  • Stress Hormones Spike as the Temperature Rises

    Released April 25, 2018 - A new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Drinking Kefir May Prompt Brain-Gut Communication to Lower Blood Pressure

    Released April 25, 2018 - Drinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Preconception Zinc Deficiency Could Spell Bad News for Fertility

    Released April 24, 2018 - An estimated 10 percent of couples in the U.S. struggle with infertility. While a variety of factors can make it difficult for some people to get pregnant, ovulation disorders are a leading cause of female infertility. Now, researchers have found that zinc deficiency can negatively affect the early stages of egg development, reducing the ability of the egg cells to divide and be fertilized. This may affect fertility months in the future. The researchers will present their results at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Mental, Not Physical, Fatigue Affects Seniors’ Walking Ability

    Released April 24, 2018 - Low “mental energy” may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research about the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Slower Calorie Burn during Pregnancy May Mean More Retained Baby Weight in Obese Black Moms

    Released April 22, 2018 - Differences in the way women with obesity burn calories during pregnancy may be a contributor to long-term postpartum weight retention in black moms. A new study shows that despite similar levels of food intake and activity levels—and a higher proportion of fat-free mass—obese black women burned fewer calories than their white counterparts. The findings, which suggest a need for more individualized pregnancy weight gain recommendations for obese women, will be presented today at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Drinking Water May Help Exercising Seniors Stay Mentally Sharp

    Released April 22, 2018 - Older people should drink more water to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, new research suggests. The study, to be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego, explores the association between hydration status before exercising and exercise-enhanced cognition in older adults.
  • Resistance Exercise Improves Insulin Resistance, Glucose Levels

    Released April 3, 2018 - A new study suggests that resistance exercise may improve indicators of type 2 diabetes by increasing expression of a protein that regulates blood sugar (glucose) absorption in the body. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism, was chosen as an APSselect article for April.
  • Opioids No More? Review Article Evaluates Alternative Treatments for Chronic Pain

    Released March 29, 2018 - An estimated 2 million people in the U.S. are addicted to prescription opioids—powerful doctor-prescribed medications for chronic or severe pain. The drugs are commonly prescribed to treat gastrointestinal pain caused by conditions such as Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), raising the risk of addiction among this population. A review published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology explores newer, potentially safer therapies for treating chronic abdominal pain with lower risks of addiction and side effects.
  • Hair Loss Drug Might Improve Vascular Health, Mental Decline

    Released March 20, 2018 - Minoxidil, a popular drug used on the scalp to treat hair loss, might improve blood flow to the brain, lower blood pressure and increase elasticity in the blood vessels if taken in an oral form, according to a new study in mice. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Aging + Lung Stiffening = Function Decline

    Released March 8, 2018 - New research suggests that certain areas of the lungs are more likely than others to show age-related damage that compromises respiratory function. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.
  • Muscle Regeneration Compromises Stability in Muscular Dystrophy

    Released February 28, 2018 - A new study finds that muscle fibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) split during regeneration to such an extreme that the muscle is weakened beyond repair. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Diabetic Nerve Damage May Increase Energy Needed for Walking

    Released February 21, 2018 - A new study suggests that diabetes-related nerve damage (peripheral neuropathy) may reduce the amount of energy stored by the Achilles tendon during walking. The tendon connects the back of the heel to the calf muscles. This reduction increases the energy required for locomotion (“cost of walking”). The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Simulated Virtual Patients Improve Students’ Learning Experience

    Released February 14, 2018 - Medical students in India are using computer-simulated virtual patients (SVPs) as a learning tool for clinical skills and are becoming more enthusiastic about their studies. SVPs allow students to interact with and perform procedures on pretend patients that are programmed to exhibit symptoms of illness or injury. The article is published in Advances in Physiology Education.
  • Arm Exercise Improves Walking Ability after Stroke

    Released February 6, 2018 - A new study shows that arm exercises may improve walking ability months and even years after having a stroke. The study, the first to test the influence of arm training on post-stroke leg function, is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.
  • Hunger Overrides Sense of Fullness After Weight Loss

    Released February 1, 2018 - The levels of hormones that control hunger and fullness(satiety) both rise after weight loss, but individuals may only experience an increase in hunger, according to a new study. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Individuals with HIV at Higher Risk for Heart Disease

    Released January 24, 2018 - A review of more than 80 studies reveals that changes in the immune cells of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The review is published in the journal Physiology.
  • Overweight Female Kidney Donors May Be at Risk for Preeclampsia

    Female kidney donors who are overweight may be at a higher risk for preeclampsia during pregnancy, according to a new study. The increased risk is due to a reduction in a type of kidney function called renal functional reserve (RFR). The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.
  • Arsenic-Tainted Drinking Water May Increase Diabetes Risk

    Released January 10, 2018 - A new study reports that chronic exposure to arsenic interferes with insulin secretion in the pancreas, which may increase the risk of diabetes. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January.