2019 Press Releases


  • Morning Exercise Helps Keep Blood Flowing to the Brain All Day

    Released April 11, 2019 - New research suggests that exercising early in the day protects brain blood flow from some of the negative effects from hours of sitting. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. The paper was chosen as an APSselect article for April.
  • Antioxidant Cocktail Improved Vascular Function in Patients with Heart Failure

    Released April 9, 2019 - A combination of over-the-counter antioxidants shows promise for mitigating some damaging effects of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a new study reports. The research, which will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla., is the first to evaluate the efficacy of antioxidants to improve vascular function in patients with HFpEF.
  • Melatonin’s Heart Protective Effects Not Related to Its Antioxidant Properties

    Released April 9, 2019 - Although melatonin does improve the outcomes of induced heart attacks in rats, those improvements are not the result of its antioxidant effect, new research finds. The study comparing antioxidant activity and heart protection will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • More Sleep May Help Teens with ADHD Focus and Organize

    Released April 8, 2019 - Teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from more sleep to help them focus, plan and control their emotions. The findings—the first of their kind in young people with ADHD—will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • Dietary Supplement Boosts Cognitive Function in Vegetarians

    Released April 8, 2019 - Vegetarians who take the dietary supplement creatine may enjoy improved brain function, according to a new study. The research will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • Performance-enhancing Drugs May Increase Risk of Teen Cocaine Abuse, Impair Fertility

    Released April 8, 2019 - Performance-enhancing steroid use could increase the risk of cocaine use and addiction in teens, according to a new rodent study. The combination of these drugs could also impair fertility in young women. The research will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • New Study Explains Why Drinking Alcohol Causes the Munchies

    Released April 8, 2019 - New research in mice suggests that a shared circuit in the brain could be one reason why heavy drinking and high-fat “junk food” cravings go hand in hand. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • Device-guided Breathing Lowers Heart Rate, Sympathetic Activity in People with PTSD

    Released April 7, 2019 - Device-guided breathing may improve physiological symptoms in people with severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • Blocking Opioid Receptors Could Reduce Hormone-therapy-fueled Increases in Sugar Intake

    Released April 7, 2019 - Estradiol is a commonly prescribed estrogen therapy. Previous research has found that rats treated with the hormone experience an increase in sugar consumption. But according to new research, blocking the body’s opioid receptors can reverse this effect. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • Sunscreen Use Could Lead to Better Blood Vessel Health

    Released April7, 2019 - A new study suggests that sunscreen protects the skin’s blood vessel function from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure by protecting dilation of the blood vessels. Perspiration on the skin may also provide protection to the skin’s blood vessels from sun damage. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.
  • Sleep Problems, Alzheimer’s Disease Are Linked, But Which Comes First?

    Released March 22, 2019 - A new article explores the pathophysiological factors that link sleep disturbances and Alzheimer’s disease. Better understanding of this connection may lead to potential diagnostics and therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP).
  • Better Regulation of the Immune System May Minimize Preeclampsia Symptoms

    Released March 5, 2019 - Boosting the body’s levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4)—an immune system protein that controls inflammation—may help manage the pregnancy complication preeclampsia, according to a new rodent study. The research, published in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for March.
  • Hypertension-related Changes May Occur Earlier in Young Women with Family History

    Released March 6, 2019 - New research suggests that young women with a family history of high blood pressure (hypertension) have decreased baroreflex function, which may increase their risk for hypertension later in life. The article, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP), was chosen as an APSselect article for March.
  • Brain Processes Concrete and Abstract Words Differently

    Released February 28, 2019 - A new review explores the different areas of the brain that process the meaning of concrete and abstract concepts. The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP).
  • Exercise Gives Older Men a Better Brain Boost

    Released February 13, 2019 - New research suggests that the relationship between physical and brain fitness varies in older adults by virtue of their sex. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Flaxseed Fiber Ferments in Gut to Improve Health, Reduce Obesity

    Released February 5, 2019 - Research in mice suggests that fermentation of flaxseed fibers in the gut changes the microbiota to improve metabolic health and protect against diet-induced obesity. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism, was chosen as an APSselect article for February.
  • Exercise May Fight Depression in Older Adults, Study Suggests

    Released January 31, 2019 - New research suggests that exercise-induced muscle changes could help boost mood in older adults. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Zinc Deficiency May Play a Role in High Blood Pressure

    Released January 24, 2019 - Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.
  • Soft Drinks + Hard Work + Hot Weather = Possible Kidney Disease Risk

    Released January 17, 2019 - New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Sex Differences in ‘Body Clock’ May Benefit Women’s Heart Health

    Released January 10, 2019 - Research suggests that a gene that governs the body’s biological (circadian) clock acts differently in males versus females and may protect females from heart disease. The study is the first to analyze circadian blood pressure rhythms in female mice. The research, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January.