2015 Press Releases


  • When Exercise Is Unhealthy for the Heart: Researchers Describe How Heart Problems and Sudden Cardiac Death Occur with Endurance Exercise

    Released November 25, 2015 - Endurance exercise accelerates the development of heart problems in individuals with a particular genetic mutation, a new study finds. In mice with a mutated version of desmoplakin, a protein that maintains the heart wall, exercise made the heart walls come apart sooner. The findings offer insight into how to best manage exercise in individuals with the mutation.
  • Genes May Determine the Side Effects of Menopausal Hormone Therapy, Study Suggests

    Released November 10, 2015 - Cardiovascular disease risk in women increases after menopause and is associated with the drop in estrogen levels. Menopausal hormone therapy could slow the progression, but oral formulations also increase the risk of blood clots. A new study reports that whether a woman will obtain cardiovascular benefits from certain types of hormone therapy may depend on her genes.
  • Vitamin C: The Exercise Replacement?

    Released September 4, 2015 - Exercise improves health in overweight and obese adults but can be hard to incorporate into a daily routine. New findings show that taking vitamin C supplements daily instead can have similar cardiovascular benefits as regular exercise in these adults. This study will be presented at 14th International Conference on Endothelin: Physiology, Pathophysiology and Therapeutics in Savannah, Ga.
  • New Research Shows Why Statins Should Be Viewed as a Double-Edged Sword

    Released August 13, 2015 - Statins have significant cardiovascular benefits, but also serious side effects. A new study finds that statin use impairs stem cell function, which helps in slowing atherosclerosis but hinders other body processes. Because of these effects, the study supports weighing individual risk when considering statins as a preventive measure.
  • Resuming Exercise Soon After Heart Attack Can Improve Heart Recovery

    Released August 3, 2015 - Many lifestyle factors cause heart disease, and exercise may not be enough to prevent heart attacks. A new study shows that regular exercise can still benefit the heart after a heart attack occurs. This research is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program.
  • This Week’s Articles in PresS Highlights

    Released July 23, 2015 - How the components of the Mediterranean lifestyle—with the exception of wine—work to combat cardiovascular disease risk and how drinking more beet juice can improve exercise performance and lengthen workouts are featured this week.
  • This Week’s Articles in PresS Highlights

    Released July 15, 2015 - The link between PTSD and cardiovascular disease and treating liver cirrhosis with diabetes drug metformin are featured this week.
  • Can Four Fish Oil Pills a Day Keep the Doctor Away? For Healthy Seniors, Perhaps

    Released July 6, 2015 - Omega-3 fish oil is a popular supplement because of its perceived cardiovascular benefits, but the scientific evidence has been conflicting. New research in Physiological Reports supports the claims for seniors, finding that healthy seniors who took omega-3 supplements every day had better cardiovascular health after 12 weeks of use.
  • July APSselect Research Highlights

    Released July 1, 2015 - Brown adipose transplantation reverses type 1 diabetes in mice; heme oxygenase system as a potential therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases; benefits of caloric restriction for muscle metabolism and mass during middle age; muscle signature of a champion sprinter are among this month’s selected articles.
  • Better than Stem Cells: Researchers Develop a Faster Way to Treat the Heart after a Heart Attack

    Released June 16, 2015 - For healing the heart after a heart attack, stem cell therapies show promise but are slow to implement. Researchers develop a new treatment called microsphere therapy that can be kept on-hand and administered more readily than stem cells.
  • Making the Heart Beat with Ultrasonic Waves

    Released April 23, 2015 - Researchers from Drexel University demonstrate that ultrasound can increase the rate at which heart cells beat and describe the settings that can do so most effectively.