2018 Press Releases


  • Curry Spice Boosts Exercise Performance in Mice with Heart Failure

    Released November 29, 2018 - New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Eat Your Vegetables (and Fish): Another Reason Why They May Promote Heart Health

    Released November 6, 2018 - Elevated levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)—a compound linked with the consumption of seafood and a primarily vegetarian diet—may reduce hypertension-related heart disease symptoms. New research in rats finds that low-dose treatment with TMAO reduced heart thickening (cardiac fibrosis) and markers of heart failure in an animal model of hypertension. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for November.
  • Hormone Therapy for ‘Low T’ May Not Be Safe for All Men

    Released October 3, 2018 - Boosting testosterone levels with hormone supplements may not be safe or appropriate for all men with low testosterone (low T), according to new research. Recent findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Study Finds More Belly Fat, Less Muscle After Crash Dieting

    Released October 2, 2018 - Extreme dieting causes short-term body changes that may have long-term health consequences, according to a new study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Delayed Pregnancy = Heart Health Risks for Moms and Sons, Study Shows

    Released October 1, 2018 - Delaying pregnancy may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in both women and their children, with boys at higher risk of disease, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Alberta in Canada will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Drug Cocktail May Treat Postmenopausal PCOS Complications

    Released October 1, 2018 - A combination of a diabetes drug and a high blood pressure medication may effectively treat all symptoms of postmenopausal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Caution Needed When Prescribing Antibiotics to Hypertension Patients, Study Finds

    Released August 23, 2018 - Individual variations in genetic makeup and gut bacteria may explain the different effects of antibiotics on blood pressure, a new rat study suggests. The findings are published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • Estrogen May Protect Against Depression after Heart Attack

    Released August 9, 2018 - Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Diabetes during Pregnancy May Increase Baby’s Heart Disease Risk

    Released July 19, 2018 - Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein’s function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Smell Receptors in the Body Could Help Sniff Out Disease

    Released July 12, 2018 - A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors—proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell—perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer. The article is published in the July issue of Physiological Reviews.
  • Increased Nerve Activity May Raise Blood Pressure in Anxiety

    Released May 3, 2018 - Sympathetic nerve activity to skeletal muscle blood vessels—a function of the nervous system that helps regulate blood pressure—increases during physiological and mental stress in people with chronic anxiety, a new study finds. Over time, this response may increase the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, although the study did not test this specifically. The study, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for May.
  • Drinking Kefir May Prompt Brain-Gut Communication to Lower Blood Pressure

    Released April 25, 2018 - Drinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Hair Loss Drug Might Improve Vascular Health, Mental Decline

    Released March 20, 2018 - Minoxidil, a popular drug used on the scalp to treat hair loss, might improve blood flow to the brain, lower blood pressure and increase elasticity in the blood vessels if taken in an oral form, according to a new study in mice. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Individuals with HIV at Higher Risk for Heart Disease

    Released January 24, 2018 - A review of more than 80 studies reveals that changes in the immune cells of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The review is published in the journal Physiology.