2015 Press Releases


  • Diet Lacking Soluble Fiber Promotes Weight Gain, Mouse Study Suggests

    Released October 30, 2015 - A new study in American Journal of Physiology--Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology highlights the importance of the gut microbiome in maintaining intestinal and metabolic health and suggests that eating more foods high in soluble fiber may help prevent metabolic disease and obesity. This research is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program.
  • This Week’s Articles in PresS Highlights

    Released August 19, 2015 - New treatments for fibromyalgia and a dairy-derived protein discovered to be a prebiotic that holds promise for treating gastrointestinal conditions and obesity are featured this week.
  • This Week’s Articles in PresS Highlights

    Released July 15, 2015 - The link between PTSD and cardiovascular disease and treating liver cirrhosis with diabetes drug metformin are featured this week.
  • Promising New NSAID-Derivative May Be Well-Tolerated by Chronic Pain Sufferers

    Released July 1, 2015 - Long-term use of naproxen (ALEVE), a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), is often prescribed for chronic pain conditions such as osteoarthritis. However, because of NSAID-related gastrointestinal problems including stomach and intestinal inflammation and ulcers, many are unable to tolerate ongoing use. A new study, published in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, finds that a naproxen-derivative may provide both symptom relief and gastrointestinal protection. The research is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program.
  • The Burmese Python in Wonderland: How the Snake Grows and Shrinks after It Eats

    Released May 18, 2015 - The Burmese python's body and organs grow dramatically after it eats and then shrink after the meal is digested. This study is the first to link the extreme body changes directly to changes in gene expression and show how quickly gene expression shifts after the snake eats.
  • New Hope for Short Bowel Syndrome

    Released May 4, 2015 - Researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles have successfully made a small intestine that has the structural and molecular components of a healthy intestine. This article was chosen as an APSselect article for May.
  • Why Gastrointestinal Disorders Afflict Women More Often

    Released March 30, 2015 - Women are more likely to have irritable bowel syndrome and other gastrointestinal disorders than men. A new study suggests that it’s because the intestine’s nerve cells are more sluggish in women. Research will be presented at the 2015 Experimental Biology Meeting in Boston on Monday, March 30.