2017 Press Releases


  • Out of Balance: Gut Bacterial Makeup May Exacerbate Pain in Sickle Cell Disease

    Released November 7, 2017 - An overabundance of the bacteria Veillonella in the digestive tract may increase pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Researchers from Howard University will present their findings at the APS Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease conference in Washington, D.C.
  • Get Fewer Antioxidants? Lower Levels May Lessen Damage from Colitis

    Released September 28, 2017 - A new study finds that lowering the levels of an antioxidant in the colon has an unexpectedly positive effect on gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Prolonged Military-Style Training Causes Changes to Intestinal Bacteria

    Released May 4, 2017 - A new study finds that long periods of physiological stress can change the composition of microorganisms residing in the intestines (intestinal microbiota), which could increase health risks in endurance athletes and military personnel. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, is the first to study the response of the intestinal microbiota during military training. The manuscript was chosen as an APSselect article for May.
  • Vitamin A + High-Fat Diet = Increased Risk for Obesity, Diabetes

    Released April 25, 2017 - Vitamin A is an essential nutrient that the human body needs to function properly. But new research presented today at the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting in Chicago suggests that normal levels of vitamin A within a high-fat diet can negatively affect expression of liver genes associated with glucose and fat metabolism.
  • To Eat or Not to Eat (Before Exercising): That Is the Question

    Released April 6, 2017 - Exercise enthusiasts often wonder whether it’s better to eat or fast before a workout. A new study is the first of its kind to show the effects of eating versus fasting on gene expression in adipose (fat) tissue in response to exercise. This difference highlights the different roles fat plays in powering and responding to exercise. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Statins May Provide Treatment Alternative for Chronic Liver Disease

    Released March 23, 2017 - Statin drugs are widely used to manage high cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. But in a new review of more than 50 studies, researchers cite reductions in liver inflammation and improvements in other related factors as reasons why statins make good candidates for treating chronic liver disease. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Researchers Find Unhealthy Gut Microbes a Cause of Hypertension

    Released February 2, 2017 - Researchers have found that the microorganisms residing in the intestines (microbiota) play a role in the development of high blood pressure in rats. The study is published in Physiological Genomics. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.
  • Food and Antibiotics May Change Microorganisms in Gut, Causing IBS

    Released January 26, 2017 - A recent review of research suggests that changes to the microorganisms (microbiota) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be a cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The review article is published in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Type, Not Just Amount, of Sugar Consumption Matters in Risk of Health Problems

    Released January 19, 2017 - The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.