2018 Press Releases


  • Exercise Following Weight Loss May Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

    Released December 12, 2018 - New research suggests that exercise is a key factor in reducing colorectal cancer risk after weight loss. According to the study, physical activity causes beneficial changes in the bone marrow. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Eat Your Vegetables (and Fish): Another Reason Why They May Promote Heart Health

    Released November 6, 2018 - Elevated levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)—a compound linked with the consumption of seafood and a primarily vegetarian diet—may reduce hypertension-related heart disease symptoms. New research in rats finds that low-dose treatment with TMAO reduced heart thickening (cardiac fibrosis) and markers of heart failure in an animal model of hypertension. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology and was chosen as an APSselect article for November.
  • Motion Sickness vs. Cybersickness: Two Different Problems or the Same Condition?

    Released October 23, 2018 - Contrary to previous research, severe motion sickness and cybersickness—a type of motion sickness that stems from exposure to virtual reality—may be considered the same clinical condition, according to researchers. The findings, the first to study both conditions in the same group of people, are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Losing Just Six Hours of Sleep Could Increase Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

    Released September 5, 2018 - Losing a single night’s sleep may affect the liver’s ability to produce glucose and process insulin, increasing the risk of metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis (fatty liver) and type 2 diabetes. The findings of the mouse study are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for September.
  • Gum Disease Treatment May Improve Symptoms in Cirrhosis Patients

    Released August 29, 2018 - Routine oral care to treat gum disease (periodontitis) may play a role in reducing inflammation and toxins in the blood (endotoxemia) and improving cognitive function in people with liver cirrhosis. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Caution Needed When Prescribing Antibiotics to Hypertension Patients, Study Finds

    Released August 23, 2018 - Individual variations in genetic makeup and gut bacteria may explain the different effects of antibiotics on blood pressure, a new rat study suggests. The findings are published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • More Protein after Weight Loss May Reduce Fatty Liver Disease

    Released August 16, 2018 - Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver’s fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Blocking Digestive Hormone May Prevent Diet-Induced Pancreatic Cancer

    Released August 2, 2018 - A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking CCK may help prevent the spread of pancreatic tumors to other areas of the body (metastases). The new findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for August.
  • Smell Receptors in the Body Could Help Sniff Out Disease

    Released July 12, 2018 - A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors—proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell—perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer. The article is published in the July issue of Physiological Reviews.
  • Drinking Kefir May Prompt Brain-Gut Communication to Lower Blood Pressure

    Released April 25, 2018 - Drinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Opioids No More? Review Article Evaluates Alternative Treatments for Chronic Pain

    Released March 29, 2018 - An estimated 2 million people in the U.S. are addicted to prescription opioids—powerful doctor-prescribed medications for chronic or severe pain. The drugs are commonly prescribed to treat gastrointestinal pain caused by conditions such as Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), raising the risk of addiction among this population. A review published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology explores newer, potentially safer therapies for treating chronic abdominal pain with lower risks of addiction and side effects.
  • Tapeworms Could Prevent, Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children

    Released March 1, 2018 - New research suggests that parasitic worms could someday help prevent or treat pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for March.
  • Hunger Overrides Sense of Fullness After Weight Loss

    Released February 1, 2018 - The levels of hormones that control hunger and fullness(satiety) both rise after weight loss, but individuals may only experience an increase in hunger, according to a new study. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.