2017 Press Releases


  • High-Fat Diet May Change Breast Milk Makeup, Affect Baby’s Health

    Released November 21, 2017 - New research suggests that following a high-fat diet during lactation—regardless of diet during pregnancy—alters RNA activity in breast milk. The changes in genetic material may increase the risk of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes in offspring. The article is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • Exercise Nerve Response in Type 1 Diabetes Worsens over Time

    Released October 18, 2017 - A new study finds that late-stage type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) weakens the autonomic reflex that regulates blood pressure during exercise, impairing circulation, nerve function and exercise tolerance. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Review Study Explores Causes of Physical Inactivity

    Released October 4, 2017 - A new review of more than 500 studies examines the environmental and physiological causes of physical inactivity and the role it plays in the development of chronic disease. The article is published in Physiological Reviews.
  • Preemies’ Separation from Mom + Stress May Increase Health Risks in Adulthood

    Released September 20, 2017 - A new study suggests that physiological stress in premature infants combined with separation from their mothers may have lasting effects into adulthood. In clinical studies, these factors have been found to increase the risk of obesity and insulin resistance, leading to metabolic disorders such as metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Cardiovascular Aging Symposium Explores Dysfunction and Disease Development

    Released August 12, 2017 - During the “Novel Implications for Blood Flow and Vascular Dysfunction in Non-cardiovascular Related Disease” symposium at the APS Cardiovascular Aging: New Frontiers and Old Friends conference, researchers will present findings that emphasize the interaction between age-related cardiovascular dysfunction and disease whose risk increases with age.
  • Short, High-Intensity Exercise Sessions Improve Insulin Production in Type 2 Diabetes

    Released May 31, 2017 - A new study finds that short, functional-movement and resistance training workouts, called functional high-intensity training (F-HIT), may improve beta-cell function in adults with type 2 diabetes. Beta cells in the pancreas produce, store and secrete insulin, which allows your body to use sugar for energy. The small study is the first one of its kind to analyze beta-cell function in F-HIT or resistance training. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Can Aromatherapy Calm Competition Horses?

    Released April 26, 2017 - Although studies suggest that inhaling certain scents may reduce stress in humans, aromatherapy is relatively unexplored in veterinary medicine. But new research presented today at the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting in Chicago raises the question of whether aromatherapy may be beneficial to horses as well.
  • Vitamin A + High-Fat Diet = Increased Risk for Obesity, Diabetes

    Released April 25, 2017 - Vitamin A is an essential nutrient that the human body needs to function properly. But new research presented today at the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting in Chicago suggests that normal levels of vitamin A within a high-fat diet can negatively affect expression of liver genes associated with glucose and fat metabolism.
  • Starvation Prompts Body Temperature, Blood Sugar Changes to Tolerate Next Food Limitation

    Release April 24, 2017 - Rats that have experienced past episodes of limited food resources make physiological adaptations that may extend their lives the next time they are faced with starvation. New research about starvation physiology will be presented today at the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting in Chicago.
  • Synched Work Schedules during “Antarctic Summer” May Affect Sleep, Wake Hormones

    Released March 9, 2017 - The continuous daylight conditions of summer in Antarctica are known to interfere with physiological functions such as sleep patterns and the release of melatonin, a hormone associated with circadian rhythms and sleep. Now, a study offers new information about why people in this region sleep poorly, and suggests that social behavior may also play a role. The study, published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for March.
  • “Superhero Physiology: the Case for Captain America”

    Released February 28, 2017 - A common challenge to educators across all disciplines is making learning interesting for students. Researchers from Mississippi State University outline a compelling strategy to teach physiology to undergraduate students: using real physiological concepts to explain some of the extreme physical transformations of the fictional superhero Captain America. The article is published in Advances in Physiology Education.
  • Raising Dietary Potassium to Sodium Ratio Helps Reduce Heart, Kidney Disease

    Released February 21, 2017 - Reducing sodium (salt) in the diet has been recommended to lower blood pressure and the risk of heart disease. However, in a new review article, University of Southern California researchers found that increasing dietary potassium is as important to improving the risk factors for cardiovascular and kidney disease as limiting dietary sodium. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.