2018 Press Releases


  • Can’t Exercise? A Hot Bath May Help Improve Inflammation, Metabolism, Study Suggests

    Released November 14, 2018 Hot water treatment may help improve inflammation and blood sugar (glucose) levels in people who are unable to exercise, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Hormone Therapy for ‘Low T’ May Not Be Safe for All Men

    Released October 3, 2018 - Boosting testosterone levels with hormone supplements may not be safe or appropriate for all men with low testosterone (low T), according to new research. Recent findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Exercise Helps Bones, but Not Metabolism, in Ovarian Function Loss

    Released October 1, 2018 - Exercise may reduce the risk of osteoporosis associated with the loss of ovarian function, but fitness may not protect against related metabolic changes and weight gain, a new study reports. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Drug Cocktail May Treat Postmenopausal PCOS Complications

    Released October 1, 2018 - A combination of a diabetes drug and a high blood pressure medication may effectively treat all symptoms of postmenopausal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Anxious and Forgetful after Menopause? Low Estrogen May Be to Blame

    Released October 1, 2018 - Lack of estrogen may play a role in the development of anxiety and memory problems, according to a new rodent study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Losing Just Six Hours of Sleep Could Increase Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

    Released September 5, 2018 - Losing a single night’s sleep may affect the liver’s ability to produce glucose and process insulin, increasing the risk of metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis (fatty liver) and type 2 diabetes. The findings of the mouse study are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for September.
  • More Protein after Weight Loss May Reduce Fatty Liver Disease

    Released August 16, 2018 - Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver’s fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Estrogen May Protect Against Depression after Heart Attack

    Released August 9, 2018 - Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Diabetes during Pregnancy May Increase Baby’s Heart Disease Risk

    Released July 19, 2018 - Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein’s function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Omega-3, Omega-6 in Diet Alters Gene Expression in Obesity

    Released May 15, 2018 - A new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • Stress Hormones Spike as the Temperature Rises

    Released April 25, 2018 - A new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Resistance Exercise Improves Insulin Resistance, Glucose Levels

    Released April 3, 2018 - A new study suggests that resistance exercise may improve indicators of type 2 diabetes by increasing expression of a protein that regulates blood sugar (glucose) absorption in the body. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism, was chosen as an APSselect article for April.
  • Diabetic Nerve Damage May Increase Energy Needed for Walking

    Released February 21, 2018 - A new study suggests that diabetes-related nerve damage (peripheral neuropathy) may reduce the amount of energy stored by the Achilles tendon during walking. The tendon connects the back of the heel to the calf muscles. This reduction increases the energy required for locomotion (“cost of walking”). The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Simulated Virtual Patients Improve Students’ Learning Experience

    Released February 14, 2018 - Medical students in India are using computer-simulated virtual patients (SVPs) as a learning tool for clinical skills and are becoming more enthusiastic about their studies. SVPs allow students to interact with and perform procedures on pretend patients that are programmed to exhibit symptoms of illness or injury. The article is published in Advances in Physiology Education.
  • Hunger Overrides Sense of Fullness After Weight Loss

    Released February 1, 2018 - The levels of hormones that control hunger and fullness(satiety) both rise after weight loss, but individuals may only experience an increase in hunger, according to a new study. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism.
  • Arsenic-Tainted Drinking Water May Increase Diabetes Risk

    Released January 10, 2018 - A new study reports that chronic exposure to arsenic interferes with insulin secretion in the pancreas, which may increase the risk of diabetes. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January.