2017 Press Releases


  • Taking Folic Acid in Late Pregnancy May Increase Childhood Allergy Risk

    Released December 21, 2017 - A new study suggests that taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in offspring affected by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Early-life Trauma May Increase Heart Disease Risk in Adults

    Released December 7, 2017 - Stress in early life may change the immune response in the kidneys, increasing the risk of heart disease later in life, according to a new study. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for December.
  • Exercise May Help Protect Smokers from Inflammation, Muscle Damage

    Released November 28, 2017 - Regular exercise may protect smokers from some of the negative effects associated with smoking, such as muscle loss and inflammation, according to a new study. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Getting Enough Sleep May Help Skin Wounds Heal Faster

    Released November 14, 2017 - Getting more sleep may help wound healing, and a nutrition supplement may also help, according to a new study. The paper, published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for November.
  • Hypertension in Women: Review Calls for More Data to Improve Treatment

    Released October 26, 2017 - Women account for half of all cases of high blood pressure (hypertension) in the U.S., yet the majority of hypertension research focuses on men. A review of more than 80 studies highlights sex differences in hypertension-related kidney (renal) disease and explores possible reasons why women respond differently than men. The article, published in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology, emphasizes the need for more hypertension research in females.
  • Get Fewer Antioxidants? Lower Levels May Lessen Damage from Colitis

    Released September 28, 2017 - A new study finds that lowering the levels of an antioxidant in the colon has an unexpectedly positive effect on gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Heat Could Aid the Treatment of Cancer, Organ Transplant and Autoimmune Diseases

    Released August 29, 2017 - Heat therapy may be a promising treatment in the fight against cancer, autoimmune problems and efforts to avoid organ rejection in transplant patients, according to researchers at the University of Kentucky. The research team exposed colorectal cancer cells and T-cells to temperatures lower and higher than normal body temperatures to observe the effects of temperature change on cellular energy production. They found that heat exposure can slow cancer cell growth and activate T-cells to fight infection. They will present their findings at the Physiological Bioenergetics: Mitochondria from Bench to Bedside conference in San Diego.
  • Pollution Exposure during Pregnancy Increases Asthma Risk for Three Generations

    Released July 18, 2017 - Exposure to environmental pollutants during pregnancy may increase the risk of asthma for as many as three consecutive generations, according to new research. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.
  • Altered Immune Cells May Both Contribute to Preeclampsia and Offer New Hope for Treatment

    Released April 23, 2017 - In a new study presented at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017, researchers have found that the immune system’s natural killer (NK) cells activate and change in response to placental ischemia. Disrupting these altered cells seems to blunt some of the dangerous complications of the condition, including high blood pressure (hypertension) and inflammation in the mother and growth restriction in the fetus.