2018 Press Releases


  • Curry Spice Boosts Exercise Performance in Mice with Heart Failure

    Released November 29, 2018 - New research suggests that curcumin, a main ingredient in curry, may improve exercise intolerance related to heart failure. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Chemotherapy May Lead to Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle

    Released October 4, 2018 - Chemotherapy drugs to treat breast cancer may promote muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, according to new research. Dysfunctional mitochondria, the energy centers of the cells, may contribute to fatigue and weakness that people with breast cancer may experience through the course of disease treatment. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Crunched for Time? High-intensity Exercise = Same Cell Benefits in Fewer Minutes

    Released September 20, 2018 - A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Obesity Alters Airway Muscle Function, Increases Asthma Risk

    Released September 13, 2018 - New research suggests that obesity changes how airway muscles function, increasing the risk of developing asthma. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.
  • Heat Therapy Boosts Mitochondrial Function in Muscles

    Released July 31, 2018 - A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease. The study—the first of its kind in humans—is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Omega-3, Omega-6 in Diet Alters Gene Expression in Obesity

    Released May 15, 2018 - A new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • Mental, Not Physical, Fatigue Affects Seniors’ Walking Ability

    Released April 24, 2018 - Low “mental energy” may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research about the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
  • Resistance Exercise Improves Insulin Resistance, Glucose Levels

    Released April 3, 2018 - A new study suggests that resistance exercise may improve indicators of type 2 diabetes by increasing expression of a protein that regulates blood sugar (glucose) absorption in the body. The paper, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism, was chosen as an APSselect article for April.
  • Muscle Regeneration Compromises Stability in Muscular Dystrophy

    Released February 28, 2018 - A new study finds that muscle fibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) split during regeneration to such an extreme that the muscle is weakened beyond repair. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Diabetic Nerve Damage May Increase Energy Needed for Walking

    Released February 21, 2018 - A new study suggests that diabetes-related nerve damage (peripheral neuropathy) may reduce the amount of energy stored by the Achilles tendon during walking. The tendon connects the back of the heel to the calf muscles. This reduction increases the energy required for locomotion (“cost of walking”). The article is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Arm Exercise Improves Walking Ability after Stroke

    Released February 6, 2018 - A new study shows that arm exercises may improve walking ability months and even years after having a stroke. The study, the first to test the influence of arm training on post-stroke leg function, is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.