2017 Press Releases


  • Taking Folic Acid in Late Pregnancy May Increase Childhood Allergy Risk

    Released December 21, 2017 - A new study suggests that taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in offspring affected by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Muscle Paralysis May Increase Bone Loss

    Released December 14, 2017 - Muscle paralysis rapidly causes inflammation in nearby bone marrow, which may promote the formation of large cells that break down bone, a new study finds. The article is published in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Sickle Cell Conference to Discuss Causes and Pathways to a Cure

    Released October 31, 2017 - Leading experts in the field of sickle cell disease (SCD) research will convene in Washington, D.C., for the Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease conference (November 6–8). The conference will explore SCD—the world’s most prevalent single gene mutation disease—and new research on preventing and reversing its deadly consequences.
  • Exercise Nerve Response in Type 1 Diabetes Worsens over Time

    Released October 18, 2017 - A new study finds that late-stage type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) weakens the autonomic reflex that regulates blood pressure during exercise, impairing circulation, nerve function and exercise tolerance. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
  • Children with ADHD Likely to Have Touch-Processing Abnormalities

    Released October 10, 2017 - Children with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) are likely to also have trouble with touch (tactile) processing. A new study finds that children with ADHD fare worse on several tests of tactile functioning, including reaction time and detecting a weak stimulus on the skin (detection threshold). The article, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for October.
  • Review Study Explores Causes of Physical Inactivity

    Released October 4, 2017 - A new review of more than 500 studies examines the environmental and physiological causes of physical inactivity and the role it plays in the development of chronic disease. The article is published in Physiological Reviews.
  • Get Fewer Antioxidants? Lower Levels May Lessen Damage from Colitis

    Released September 28, 2017 - A new study finds that lowering the levels of an antioxidant in the colon has an unexpectedly positive effect on gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
  • Electrical Stimulation Improves Paralyzed Patients’ Function

    Released September 14, 2017 - Nearly 282,000 people in the U.S. live with paralysis following a spinal cord injury (SCI). A review of more than 90 studies found that electrical stimulation may help restore function in those paralyzed after SCI. The article is published in Physiology.
  • Taking It to the Clinic: Using Mitochondria to Diagnose Disease

    Released August 28, 2017 - Leading researchers will discuss advances in understanding the role of mitochondria in health and disease and the use of the “powerhouse of the cell” as a clinical diagnostic tool during the “Translating the Mitochondria—Taking It to the Clinic” symposium at the American Physiological Society’s (APS’s) Physiological Bioenergetics: Mitochondria from Bench to Bedside conference.
  • Caffeine Shortens Recovery Time from General Anesthesia

    Released August 1, 2017 - Caffeine helps quickly boost wakefulness following general anesthesia, a new study finds. The stimulant—used daily by more than 90 percent of adults in the U.S.—appears to alter physiological function in two different ways to shorten recovery time. The paper, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for August.
  • Stroke Recovery Window May Be Wider than We Think

    Released July 12, 2017 - Stroke survivors may experience delayed recovery of limb function up to decades after injury, according to a new case study. The article, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for July.
  • Exposure to Alcohol Before Birth May Make Drinking More Appealing to Teens

    Released May 18, 2017 - A new study suggests that fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) reduces the taste system’s responsiveness to the bitter flavor and burning sensation of many varieties of alcoholic beverages. These factors make alcohol unappealing to some people, but, for reasons that are unclear, are less of a deterrent in young people exposed to alcohol before birth. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology.
  • Beetroot Juice May Provide Benefits to Heart Disease Patients

    Released May 10, 2017 - A new study finds that dietary nitrate—a compound that dilates blood vessels to decrease blood pressure—may reduce overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system that occurs with heart disease. The research team looked specifically at beetroot juice, a source of dietary nitrate, to explore its use as a future targeted treatment option for people with cardiovascular disease. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology, is the first to study the effects of nitrate supplementation on sympathetic nerve activity.
  • Cortical Nerve Function in Former Amputees Remains Poor Decades after Reconstructive Surgery

    Released April 11, 2017 - Researchers have found that the nerve cells (neurons) controlling sensation and movement of the hands show injury-induced changes for years after hand amputation, reattachment or transplant. The small study, the first of its kind to non-invasively explore the health and function of the cortical neurons (neuronal integrity) in these populations at the neurochemical level, is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology. The manuscript was chosen as an APSselect article for April.
  • Sports-Related Concussion Negatively Affects Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

    Released February 9, 2017 - A new study finds that concussion causes short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system but that these cardiovascular symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • Nerve-Signaling Protein Regulates Gene Associated with Schizophrenia

    Released January 5, 2017 - Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, have identified a protein that regulates a gene associated with schizophrenia. The study, published in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January.