2017 Press Releases


  • Taking Folic Acid in Late Pregnancy May Increase Childhood Allergy Risk

    Released December 21, 2017 - A new study suggests that taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in offspring affected by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • High-Fat Diet May Change Breast Milk Makeup, Affect Baby’s Health

    Released November 21, 2017 - New research suggests that following a high-fat diet during lactation—regardless of diet during pregnancy—alters RNA activity in breast milk. The changes in genetic material may increase the risk of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes in offspring. The article is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.
  • Preemies’ Separation from Mom + Stress May Increase Health Risks in Adulthood

    Released September 20, 2017 - A new study suggests that physiological stress in premature infants combined with separation from their mothers may have lasting effects into adulthood. In clinical studies, these factors have been found to increase the risk of obesity and insulin resistance, leading to metabolic disorders such as metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
  • New Generation Drugs May Hold Key to Alternative Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

    Released September 6, 2017 - Close to 70 percent of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) respond to the ED drug sildenafil. However, only about 50 percent of men with diabetes—a population commonly affected by ED—achieve positive results with sildenafil. Researchers from the Smooth Muscle Research Centre at the Dundalk Institute of Technology, in Dundalk, Ireland, are studying two new drugs that may give men with diabetes—and others for whom conventional treatment is ineffective—new hope for treating ED. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.
  • Mom’s, Not Dad’s, Mitochondria Create Healthy Embryos

    Released August 28, 2017 - Mammal embryos shed paternal mitochondria within days of fertilization, perhaps to ensure the offspring a healthy life, a new study shows. Researchers from the California Institute of Technology will present their findings today at the Physiological Bioenergetics: Mitochondria from Bench to Bedside conference in San Diego.
  • Menopausal Status May Better Predict Blood Vessel Health in Women than Fitness Level

    Released August 12, 2017 - High physical fitness is known to be related to enhanced blood vessel dilation and blood flow (endothelial function) in aging men. However, for women, endothelial function and the effect of exercise may be related more to menopausal status than fitness. Researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst will present their findings today at the Cardiovascular Aging: New Frontiers and Old Friends conference in Westminster, Colo.
  • Altered Immune Cells May Both Contribute to Preeclampsia and Offer New Hope for Treatment

    Released April 23, 2017 - In a new study presented at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017, researchers have found that the immune system’s natural killer (NK) cells activate and change in response to placental ischemia. Disrupting these altered cells seems to blunt some of the dangerous complications of the condition, including high blood pressure (hypertension) and inflammation in the mother and growth restriction in the fetus.
  • High-Fat Diet during Pregnancy Compromises Offspring’s Lung Health

    Released March 29, 2017 - Women who follow a high-fat diet during pregnancy may increase their children’s risk for asthma. A mouse study by Oregon Health and Science University researchers suggests that consistent consumption of fat-laden foods may change the immune response of the offsprings’ respiratory system. The article is published in Physiological Reports.